Marbled Easter Eggs – The Edible Kind

Years ago when I was part of a Stampin Up! card club, our demonstrator showed us a cool trick using shaving cream and ink. I loved the effect it created, but never used it again in my life. So when a friend and I were talking about using the same idea to dye eggs, I was excited.

But then…it occured to me…putting eggs in shaving cream makes then unedible afterwards. DARN IT!

The only reason my husband doesn’t grumble about this Easter tradition is because he knows devilled eggs will be his to enjoy afterwards. So being edible is a big thing in this house.

I was kind of bummed out because I was looking forward to doing something a little different in regards to egg dying this year. But just before I got completely bummed, I saw a Pinterest Fail on my Facebook feed about edible marbled eggs. After looking into it a bit more, I found the original post.

I was super excited because this looked super easy and something even my 3 and 5 year old could do with a little bit of help. I was determined that this was how we were dying eggs this year. So I gathered all the things I would need.

The original post says to just use one container and from what I gathered they just added different food colors to the same container. I decided that I wanted my kids to be able to switch up colors as they wanted and so I bought 3 large containers of Cool Whip. I also bought 5 different plastic containers so each of my kids had their own. This allowed us to rinse out the mixture each time we wanted to change colors and because it’s just cool whip and food coloring, a few of my kids may or may not have just ate the extra cool whip before switching to a new color.

Because I had originally found the idea on a Pinterest Fail, I made sure I followed the original poster’s instructions. We finished our eggs around 6 at night and I wasn’t going to stay up until 2 or 3 just to check the eggs. So after my baby went to bed around 1, I checked one of my eggs. It wasn’t quite ready. So I let them sit overnight and decided to clean the eggs off around 7:00 the next morning.

Here are our results.

My 3 eggs that were left over from what the kids did…

…I think the pinkish egg in the middle is the one I cleaned before I went to bed…
My 13 Year Old Son…
12 Year Old Daughter…

9 Year Old Son…

(He likes to do things in a hurry, thus the same colored eggs)

6 Year Old Son…

…I was wondering what his ‘gross’ colored eggs would turn out like, but they looked pretty awesome when all was said and done…
3 Year Old Little Girl…

…She had so much fun I let her dye all the cracked eggs…
The Final Result…
I was extremely pleased with our results. I was really worried that we’d end up with a failed result as well, but I was pleasantly surprised. I think we’ve found our new Easter Egg dye.

I loved that this was so easy, didn’t smell up the house and that it left the eggs edible in the end. The clean up isn’t too much worse than regular egg dye (at least in this house) and how pretty the eggs turn out. It was also something the older kids could do on their own, which was a major bonus. It was nice to only have to help 2 kids out.

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